Welfare Standards

EFFECTIVE MAY 1, 2006

The following Standards augment and comprise part of the Conditions to be met by participating Companies in order to qualify for “accreditation”.  Companies, whom upon being awarded accreditation will ensure all suppliers agree and comply with these standards and upon agreeing to do so, will receive their accreditation, by the authorized Company.

001. BEEF CATTLE STANDARDS

1. A fresh, wholesome diet must be provided and recorded, which is acceptable to Independent Veterinarian Standards for such Animals.

2. Clean, fresh potable water must be provided, at all times.

3. No foods containing animal protein are permitted.  The use of bulking agents, such as sawdust, pulp waste, plastic waste is not permitted.

4. Body condition must be regularly checked and maintained to a level satisfactory to meet Independent Veterinary specifications.

5. Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, heat or wind.

6. Comfortable lying areas are to be provided, including separate non-slated bedding pens are required at calving time.

7. Proper space requirements and lying areas are to be specified and must meet acceptable minimum standards defined by the Recommended Codes of Practice, except where excluded and/or replaced by

Wholesome & Humane Program “standards” and/or as may be defined by an Independent Veterinarian.

8. Building safety and maintenance schedules must be specified and meet government standards.

9. A Veterinary Health Plan must be established.

10. Husbandry procedures must be established and specified

11. Cattle must be handled quietly and firmly, with care to avoid unnecessary pain or distress, by qualified and properly trained stock handlers capable of demonstrating high standards of proficiency.

12. Electricgoads or sticks must not be used in the handling of stock except, where any other benign handling aid would place the safety of the handlers at risk, such as an aggressive bull.

13. Bulls are to be kept in small groups.

14. For identification purposes, horn branding is to be used whenever possible, otherwise an identification collar, ear tattoo, ear tag or micro-chip is acceptable (no fire branding or ear notching of any Cattle).

15. To seek alternative means to a livestock auction, where possible, such as remote site viewing via video transmission.

16. Procedures such as castration and dehorning of calves must be carried out by properly trained personnel and must be performed under local anaesthetic.  Any other surgical procedures, including castration and dehorning of adult animals must be performed under local anaesthetic and carried out under the supervision of an Independent Registered Veterinarian.

002. DAIRY CATTLE STANDARDS

1. A fresh, wholesome diet must be provided and recorded, which is acceptable to Independent Veterinarian Standards for such Animals.

2. Clean, fresh potable water must be provided, at all times.

3. No foods containing animal protein are permitted.  The use of bulking agents, such as sawdust, pulp waste, plastic waste is not permitted.

4. Body condition must be regularly checked and maintained to a level satisfactory to meet Independent Veterinary specifications.

5. Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, heat or wind.

6. Comfortable lying areas are to be provided, including separate non-slated bedding pens are required at calving time.

7. Proper space requirements and lying areas are to be specified and must meet acceptable minimum standards defined by the Recommended Codes of Practice, except where excluded and/or replaced by Wholesome & Humane Program  “standards” and/or as may be defined by an Independent Veterinarian.

8. Building safety and maintenance schedules must be specified and meet government standards.

9. A Veterinary Health Plan must be established.

10. Husbandry procedures must be established and specified

11. Milking palour equipment must be maintained in good working order and tested each day.

12. Attendants must maintain hygienic conditions in the milking palour with regard to both the well-being of animals and wholesomeness of milk.

13. All elective procedures, such as removal of extra teats, cauterization, dehorning or castration of bulls must be performed by competent personnel and must be done under local anesthetic.

14. No fire branding or ear notching is permitted, rather, micro-chip, identification collar, ear tag or ear tattoo, using local anesthetic

003. PIG STANDARDS

Livestock must have freedom from thirst, hunger and malnutrition by ready access to fresh potable water, at all times and a diet to maintain full health and promote a positive state of well-being.  Water and food must be distributed in such a way that livestock can drink and eat without undue competition.

1. Pigs must be fed a wholesome diet each day, which is appropriate to their species and which is fed to themin sufficient quantity to maintain them in good health and to satisfy their nutritional needs.  A written record of nutrient content of compound feeds and feed supplements is to be maintained and available for review.

2. No food containing mammalian derived protein is permitted, with the exception of milk.

3. There are to be no sudden changes to the type and quantity of food.  Pigs which are fed a restricted diet recommended by an independent Veterinarian, must have continuous access to straw or other suitable foraging product, such as wood chips or sawdust.  This foraging substitute must be topped up regularly, at least every two days or whole grain or feed pellets must be cast over the entire pen at intervals of not more than one week.

4. Sows must be fed in ways which avoid bullying, so that their body condition is likely to sustain full health and normal reproductive capacity over their maximum forseeable life span.  No animal must, at any time, have a body condition score less than 2 and they must have a score of at least 3 by the 70th day of pregnancy.

5. For ration feeding Pigs in a trough, there must be enough feeding space, at least 1.1 times shoulder width, for all Pigs to feed simultaneously.  A “feed place” is defined as space required by a single Pig while eating.

– When using a dry feeder, with no full head barriers between each feeding place= 8 pigs per feed place

– When full head barriers = 10 pigs per feed space

– When there is opportunity to mix water with feed, such as wet and dry feeders= 14 pigs per food place.

6. Feed hoppers/bins must be covered to reduce contamination by bird feces and vermin, as well, when pigs are not fed on the ground floor, the feeders must be kept clean during the day.

7. Piglets must not be weaned from the sow before 3 weeks of age, unless the welfare or health of the sow or piglets would otherwise be adversely affected.

8. Water delivery systems must provide access for all pigs to water, drinking bowls must be kept clean during the day and provision must be made to ensure emergency supply of suitable drinking water, in the event normal supplies fail, such as due to freezing, draught and so forth.  Any water supply used by lactating sows must have a minimum flow rate of 2 litres per minute where a nipple system is used or must be of a freely-accessible trough.

9. There must be no physical features of their environment which cause recurring injuries to pigs.  The interior of any building, including the floor and all internal fittings/surfaces to which livestock have access must be designed, constructed, maintained and regularly inspected weekly to ensure that there are no sharp edges or protrusions likely to cause injury or distress to the animal.  In both indoor and outdoor systems, there must be no recurrent injuries on the pigs attributable to physical features of their environment.

10. Pigs must not come in contact with any toxic fumes or surfaces from paints, wood preservatives or disinfectants, except where preservatives with an insecticidal role are used and such surfaces of housing and pens must be made of materials which can be readily cleansed and disinfected or be easily replaced when necessary.

11. All electrical installations at mains voltage must be inaccessible to pigs, well maintained, safeguarded from rodents, properly earthed and regularly tested.

12. Properly designed ventilation will permit the free circulation of air above pig height and avoid droughts at pig level; effective ventilation of buildings to avoid high humidity, condensation and droughts is essential as pigs can be susceptible to respiratory diseases; the thermal environments must not be so hot or so cold as to cause distress for summer conditions, provision must be made to protect pigs from heat stress.

13. Provisions must be made to ensure that when pigs are housed, aerial contaminants do not reach a level at which they are noticeable unpleasant to a human observer, specifically, inhalable dust must not exceed 10mg/m3 and ammonia must not exceed 25 ppm over any 8 hour period.

14. Pigs kept indoors must be kept on or have access at all times to a lying area of solid construction, bedded to a sufficient extent to provide a dry lying area and be of sufficient size to accomodate all pigs together lying on their sides.  In service pens the whole floor area must be kept dry or sufficient bedding provided to give adequate grip during service and the pens must be large enough to allow courtship and mating.

15. Extra space may be required to allow pigs to lie apart in hot conditions, together with systems of ventilation or water misting to maintain pigs temperatures below upper critical levels.

16. The pig must be free to turn around without difficulty at all times and to comply with provisions of this program, stalls or tethers for dry pigs are not permitted.  The dimension of any stall or pen must be such that the internal area is not less than the square of the length of the pig and no internal size less than 75% of the length of the pig; the length of the pig in each case being measured from the top of its snout to the base of its tail while standing with its back straight.  Maximum dimensions for an adult boar pen must be no less than 2.5m x 3m and 3.5m x 3m for a service pen.  Pigs must always be provided with a total floor space no less that 1.5x the thermoneutral lying area.  The minimum bedded space allowances are as follows:

Live weight (kg)                        Lying area (m2)                        Total area (m2)

20                                            0.15                                         0.225

40                                            0.26                                         0.4

60                                            0.36                                         0.55

80                                            0.45                                         0.675

100                                          0.50                                         0.75

250                                          0.90                                         1.3-1.5

17. Pigs must be kept in stable groups with as little mixing as possible and must not be closely confined but where sows and gilts are kept indoors in groups of 15 or more, aggressiveness can present a severe problem, therefore, facilities in which animals can feed individually without interference from other animals must be provided.

18. If pigs have fought to the extent that injury has resulted, a plan must be devised and implemented to changeenvironmental factors in order to prevent injury.  Environmental enrichment, reduction in stocking density or changesin feeding regime will normally prevent injury due to fighting. Particular care must be taken with sows and gilts kept in groups.

19. Pigs are normally inquisitive and must, at all times, have access to straw or other suitable media, such as wood chips or sawdust for the expression of rooting, pawing, mouthing and chewing behaviors.  Where a stereotyped or abnormal behavior develops, which injures other pigs, they must immediately be given additional stimuli to encourage foraging and otherwise managed to sustain foraging behavior and attempt to channel animals motivations away from abnormal behaviors.  If abnormal behaviors develop repeatedly in any particular pen a program of modification and enrichment must be agreed with the Veterinary Surgeon and implement promptly and pursued until the problem is overcome.  Pens must not be sited or constructed in such a way as to isolate any pig from sight, sound and odor of other pigs, particularly for boar pens.

20. Housed pigs must have access for the normal period of daylight hours in an area designed to be lit to a level of at least 50 lux at pig eye level (50 lux is bright enough to allow a person of normal eyesight to read standard newsprint without difficulty).

21. During the winter, a windproof and waterproof shelter must be accessible which has sufficient space to provide a lying area for all pigs.  During the summer, a shaded area must be accessible which has sufficient space to allow all pigs to lie down simultaneously and to lie apart from each other if they wish to.  Wallows, drips or sprinklers must be provided.

22. Outdoor pigs must be introduced to electric fencing for a minimum of 48 hours in a purpose-built training enclosure.

23. Stock-keepers must be able to demonstrate competence in handling animals in a positive and compassionate manner.  As well, they must be able to demonstrate their proficiency in procedures which have the potential to cause suffering, such as injections.  Pigs must be frequently and considerately handled by the stock-keeper in order to reduce fear and improve pig welfare and management in general terms.  Pigs must be handled quietly and firmly, with care to avoid unnecessary pain or distress and must never be pulled or dragged by the tail, ears or limbs.

24. Identification measures using properly maintained instruments and only by competent stock-handlers may include ear tagging, slap marking and tattooing.

25. The Veterinarian Health Plan forms a vitally important part of Pig Welfare Standards with regards to maintaining health and welfare of livestock on a farm, therefore, it must be drawn up and regularly updated by an independent Veterinarian.  Provision must be made for the segregation and care of sick and injured animals. Any injured, ailing or distress pig must be segregated, treated without delay and veterinary advice sought when needed. Isolation pens must be truly separate from the main accommodation.  Herd performance data must be continuously monitored for signs of disease or production disorders and if any herd performance parameters fall below the tolerance limit identified by a Veterinary Health Plan, the independent Veterinarian must be informed and the plan revised to try and remedy the problem.

26. The following potentially injurious husbandry procedures may be allowed, if approved and deemed required by an independent Veterinarian and thus only performed in a way which minimizes suffering and only by trained and competent people:

a).        Needle teeth of newborn pigs may be snipped within 3 days of birth

b).        Nose rings are not allowed except in exceptional circumstances.

c).        Tail docking, at the present time, is accepted to alleviate the pain and suffering caused by tail biting, piglets may be docked under specific instruction but these actions should be regularly reviewed with the intention of eliminating the need to continue tail docking.

d).       Castration of pigs in not permitted for pigs whose slaughter weight will not exceed 90 kgs and should castration be warranted, it must be done under anesthetic.

e).        Trimming of boar tusks may be undertaken in order to ensure the safeguarding of other animals and stock-keepers from injury.

27.       The use of pig-farrowing crates is not permitted.  The use of farrowing pens is allowed but must meet the following minimum requirements:

a).        Square pens must be 2.4 x 2.4 metres in size.  Other shaped pens must provide a similar floor space.

b).        Perimeter rails or wall cutouts with attached creep areas must be provided to prevent accidental crushing of piglets by the sow

c).        Pens must be arranged so as to allow for easy visual inspection of sows and piglets.

d).        Enclosed areas must be easily opened for inspection.

e).        Room temperature must be maintained at between 18 and 20 degrees Celsius but additional radiant or floor heating must be provided to raise temperatures to between 34 and 38 degrees Celsius for new-born piglets.  Temperatures may be lowered gradually to 25 to 30 degrees Celsius by age four weeks.

004. SHEEP STANDARDS

1. A fresh, wholesome diet must be provided and recorded, which is acceptable to independent Veterinary standards for such Animals.

2. No foods containing animal protein are permitted, including mammalian protein and milk products.

3. Clean, fresh potable water must be provided at all times.  Water receptacles must be designed and installed so as to avoid the drowning of young lambs.

4. Husbandry procedures, including a Lambs dietary needs program must be established and specified.

5. Body condition must be regularly checked and maintained to a level satisfactory to meet independent Veterinary specifications with particular attention given to the condition of feet.

6. Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, heat, wind, including comfortable lying areas.

7. Sheep must not be closely confined except during examination, while being fed, marked, washed, weighed, vaccinated or dipped, while in fostering pens, when accomodation is being cleaned or temporarily while awaiting transportation.  Any such pens must be free of all materials, including paint or preservatives, which contain substances known or suspected of causing harm to Sheep.

8. Building safety and maintenance schedules must be specified and meet government standards.

9. Inhalable dust, ammonia and lighting levels must be defined and specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

10. A Veterinary Health Plan must be established for both ewes and rams.

11. Husbandry procedures must be established and specified, including minimum inspection frequency; scanning must be used to determine foetal numbers; shearing specifications and details must be established.

12. Sheep must be handled quietly and firmly, with care to avoid unnecessary pain or distress, never lifted or dragged by the fleece or tail, by qualified and properly trained stock-handlers capable of demonstrating high standards of proficiency.

13. Electric goads or sticks must not be used in the handling of Sheep.

14. For identification purposes, horn branding of Rams is to be used whenever possible, otherwise an identification collar, ear tattoo, tagging or micro-chip is acceptable.  Any materials used for temporary marking must be non-toxic.  A maximum of one (1) ID tag per ear is permitted.  Where re-tagging is done any existing hole must be used.

15. Lambs must not be weaned before the age of eight (8) weeks.

16. All medical surgical procedures deemed medically necessary must only be carried out by a qualified Veterinarian, including, but not limited to the following:

a).        castration under local anesthetic

b).        Tail docking after seven (7) days of age

c).        The “mules operation” is not permitted under any circumstances.

d).        Horn trimming and dehorning of mature animals

17. Basic Animal Care Standards as advocated by The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) must be adhered to governing the good management and welfare of Sheep Dogs.

18. Sheep sold at livestock markets will lose the Wholesome & Humane Program  accreditation status.

005. LAYING HEN STANDARDS

1. A fresh, wholesome diet and fresh potable water must be provided, with specified access and a diet that meets acceptable independent Veterinarian standards.

2. Hens must be able to forage and ensure claw wear.

3. Hens must be able to dust bathe, preen and stretch their wings.

4. Hens must not be induced to moult – more frequent feeding is required to compensate for lower body temperature due to any feather loss.

5.  Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, wind, including access to a thermally comfortable, ventilated environment and protection from predators.

6. Perch specifications are to be defined and specified which meet standards acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

7. Hens must have a quiet nest box in which to lay eggs.

8. Clean, dry liner must be provided, at all times.

9. Dust, ammonia and light levels are to be specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

10. Stocking densities are to be specified and must meet maximum levels of 15.5 birds/m2 if perchery/barn or 1000 birds/hectare free range rotated, or 75 sq. in. per bird nesting

11. A Veterinary Health Plan must be established.

12. Husbandry procedures must be established and specified.

13. All stock-handlers must be properly trained and capable of demonstrating high standards of proficiency.

006. BROILER CHICKEN STANDARDS

1. A fresh, wholesome diet and fresh potable water must be provided, at all times, with specified drinking facility ratios per bird.

2. No feedstuffs containing growth promoters are permitted.

3. Fresh green vegetation must be provided for birds daily as a form of environmental enrichment.

4. Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, heat, wind, including an assessment of thermal requirements of the birds to ensure birds are thermally comfortable, as well, buildings must be properly ventilated.

5. Lighting levels and period of light/darkness must be defined and specified.

6. Clean, dry litter must be provided, at all times.

7. Dust and ammonia levels are to be specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

8.  Maximum stocking densities are to be specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian, not less than 72 square inches per nesting bird.

9. A Veterinary Health Plan must be established and regularly updated, which includes the monitoring of production, infectious diseases, injury and death, including standards to limit growth rate so as to allow proper development of the birds bones and joints; a management plan to prevent chickens suffering chronic joint or leg deformities.

10. Absolutely no mutilation of chickens is to occur.

11. Husbandry procedures must be established and specified.

12. All stock-handlers must be properly trained and capable of demonstrating high standards of proficiency.

13. Free-range systems must define and specify pophole dimensions, number per birds and specify length of time chickens have range access.

007.     TURKEY STANDARDS

1.         A fresh, wholesome diet and fresh potable water must be provided, at all times, with specified drinking facility ratios per bird.

2.         No feedstuffs containing growth promoters are permitted.

3.         Fresh green vegetation must be provided daily as a form of enviro enrichment.

4.         Shelter provisions must meet the needs of protection from inclement weather, wet, cold, heat, wind, including an assessment of thermal requirements of the birds to ensure birds are thermally comfortable, as well, buildings must be properly ventilated.

5.         Lighting levels and period of light/darkness must be defined and specified.

6.         Clean, dry litter must be provided, at all times.

7.         Dust and ammonia levels are to be specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

8.         Maximum stocking densities are to be specified and must meet levels acceptable to an independent Veterinarian.

9.         A Veterinary Health Plan must be established and regularly updated, which includes the monitoring of production, infectious diseases, injury and death, including standards to limit growth rate so as to allow proper development of the birds bones and joints; a management plan to prevent turkeys suffering chronic joint or leg deformities.

10.       Absolutely no mutilation of turkeys is to occur.

11.       Husbandry procedures must be established and specified.

12.       All stock-handlers must be properly trained and capable of demonstrating high standards of proficiency.

13.       Free-range systems must define and specify pophole dimensions, number per birds and specify length of time turkeys have range access.

14.       Total confinement systems are not permitted.

15.       Range turkeys must have access to shelter and natural shade.

16.       Nest boxes and roosts must be situated no more than 60 cm above ground level or must be provided with access ramps or roosts.

008.     TRANSPORTATION STANDARDS

Animal transport systems must be designed and managed to ensure livestock, poultry and other live food sources are not caused unnecessary distress or discomfort.  The transport and handling of livestock, poultry and other live food sources must be kept to an absolute minimum.  Personnel involved with the transport of live animals must be thoroughly trained and competent to carry out tasks required of them. These “Standards” apply to all cases of and reasons for transporting live animals, including to and from auctions, locally or longer distance hauling:

1.         The number of a species to be carried, by appropriate means, such as in a cage versus trailer, is as follows, with a “zero tolerance” for “overloading”, “downers” or “dead on arrival”, as a result of non-compliance to any laws or Wholesome & Humane Program 2000 “Standards”, incompetence by vehicle operators and/or stock-handlers, the results of which will exclude such “supplier” company responsible from accreditation and further participation in the program:

SPECIES                    WEIGHT RANGE                 NUMBER PER SQ. M

Cattle   – Small Calves up to 50kg                                three

– Med. Calves              50 – 110 kg                              two

– Lge. Calves                110 – 200 kg                            one

– Med. Cattle               325 – 550 kg                            one

– Lge. Cattle                 550 – 770 kg                            one per 1.3 sq. m

– Very Large                0ver 770 kg                              one per 2 sq. m

Sheep   – Shorn                                                                         four

– Unshorn                                                                     three

– Pregnant Ewe                                                             two

Pigs                                                                                          three

Chickens                                                                                  twenty (normal weather)

fifteen (above 25 degrees C)

Turkeys                                    up to 5 kg live weight                fifteen

5 – 7 kg                                                fourteen

7 – 8 kg                                                eleven

8 – 9 kg                                                ten

9 – 11kg                                   eight

12- 17kg                                  six

18- 24kg                                  five

2.         The travel time distances for all live food sources. without a stop for food, water, exercise and examination

of health condition is as follows:

SPECIES                    NORMAL      SUMMER (25 C)      WINTER (5 C)

a).        Beef Cattle                   16 hrs.              12 hrs.                          12 hrs.

b).        Calves                          16 hrs.              12 hrs.                         8 hrs.

c).        Sheep                           24 hrs.              24 hrs.                          24 hrs.

d).        Pigs                              8 hrs.              8 hrs.                           8 hrs.

e).        Poultry                         24 hrs.              16 hrs.                          16 hrs.

NOTE;

I).         Wind Chill Factors must be taken into account using the “Recommended Codes of Practice” specifications and “Manitoba Truck Measuring Program” standards.

II).       Each Animal is to be afforded a minimum of five (5) hours rest upon being unloaded from a vehicle, to consume food and water, and to exercise.

III).      If an Animal is to be transported more than sixteen (16) hours, it must have been rested a minimum of five (5) hours with food and water available, prior to transporting.  Animals are not to be denied food or water, nor given lots of salt to induce drinking more water to give a false weight prior to sales.

IV).      Each trailer is to be maintained in good maintenance and repair, be clean and sanitary, at all times, with a thorough cleaning and disinfecting performed at each rest break and at the conclusion of any trip.

3.         No pregnant cows, cows that have given birth within the last five (5) days, sick or crippled animals are to be shipped.

4.         During colder winter months, all livestock transport trailers are to be lined with wood to protect animals from the cooling effects of wind chill factor and prevent animals from “sticking” to the sides of metal trailers.

5.         All animals are to be accepted as “sentient beings” and thus capable of fear, stress and must be afforded dignity and respect:

a).        Electric prods, sticks, whips, “pig slappers”, Boar bashing using iron bars across snouts, etc., must not be used.  An exception may be an electric prod, where any other benign handling aid would place the safety of the stock-handler at risk, such as with an aggressive adult bull or boar and never be used, on any animal, on the face, anal, udder or genetial areas.

b).        No animal is to be forced to jump from a trailer or “thrown” from a livestock carrier, nor jump from ramps into the front nose of trailers.

c).        An appropriate ramp is to be affixed to each livestock carrier trailer and where uneven loading exists, such as trailer nose, which requires an animal to move from one level to another, animals must be afforded a ramp of not more than a 20% incline, to do so and both loading ramps and tail boards must be fitted with means of preventing Pigs or other Animals from falling off or slipping.

d).        No animal is to be unloaded from any livestock carrier trailer in a manner that drags the Animals in direct contact with the ground, or pulls the Animal by the head, horns, neck, feet or tail.

e).        Sufficient head room must be provided for all animals, ensuring they may stand in a natural position.

f).         Each species is to be segregated and grouped by substantially the same weight and age.  Consideration to the installation of stalls, under certain conditions, to avoid such occurrences as body pile-ups, suffocation, spills, bruising, injury and death.  Shipping losses to the meat industry during transit are considerable whereas certain precautionary measures will contribute to reduced “downers” and animal death due to other causes.

g).        Crowd gates are to be mandatory to guide livestock to required areas, on all livestock trailers and at livestock and farmers yards, eliminating the need to chase.

NOTE:  Not later than January 1, 2003 all new livestock transport carriers and by January 1, 2004 all existing livestock transport carriers, are to have mandatory ramps installed to permit loading into nose sections, crowd gates installed and small long vent slats to prevent livestock from getting legs caught and sliced, sprinklers installed that water may be sprayed in extreme heat conditions, heaters installed to control temperature in cold conditions, lights installed upper and lower to ease loading at night.

6.         Adequate straw is to be used for comfort, warmth, to prevent slipping, for drainage & absorption of urine. Minimum 20-23 bales for 46′, 25-30 bales for 48′ and 30-35 bales for 53′ trailers.

7.         An Independent Veterinarian examination and certification must be obtained for the movement of non-ambulatory animals, from the farm or other source point (non-ambulatory, disabled or downed “downer” livestock includes any animal that is unable to stand without assistance or one that cannot move without being dragged or carried):

a).        No person shall move non-ambulatory animals unless they are accompanied by a certificate for direct transport to slaughter and they are physically separated from other animals in the trailer.

b).        If animals become non-ambulatory during transport, the operator of the vehicle transporting them shall immediately, at the nearest destination point, arrange for them to be examined by an independent licensed Veterinarian and then shall transport them to a duly licensed plant for slaughter or as directed by the Veterinarian.

c).        If a Veterinarian Inspector examines livestock and finds that it is unable to stand without assistance or to move without being dragged or carried, he/she shall issue a certificate for direct transfer to slaughter or release the livestock to the operator who shall arrange for it to receive immediate care of a Veterinarian.

I).         No person shall stable any such Animals that show evidence of disease or injury in the same area as other Animals on the premises and a Veterinary Inspector shall detain any such Animal that is found in a vehicle on the premises of an operator and no person shall move a vehicle if an Animal has been detained on it.  It can only be moved directly to slaughter.

II).       ALL “downer” or sick, crippled and non-ambulatory Animals are to be humanely killed on the trailer.

III)       NO “downer” or sick Animal or Poultry is to be permitted into the Human or Animal Food Chain, unless testing guarantees and assures such food is free from disease, including BSE and otherwise deemed harmful to health.

8.         Veterinarians are to be treated and accepted as “Independent” and thus must not be coerced or in any manner threatened to avoid performance of their duties.  There needs to be a serious introspection taken by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association to satisfy itself that ALL Veterinarians are reviewed to ensure their understanding of Provincial or Federal legislation, Recommended Codes of Practice and MANDATORY “Conditions, Policies & Standards” specified in the Wholesome & Humane Program, proposed as future Federal/Provincial legislation, to ensure due diligence and absolutely no dereliction of duty ever exists and should any Veterinarian be found negligent or willfully ignoring any aspect of otherwise expected humane treatment of any Animals, to satisfy an Employers desires, they should face punishment and loss of license to perform as an “independent” Veterinarian in any aspect of Animals husbandry pertaining to work on a Farm, Feed-Lot, Livestock Transport Company or Abattoir.

9.         Livestock Transport Carrier personnel are to be treated as “professional” driver/stock-handlers, fully competent, trained in laws and “Standards” contained in this program and experienced for each task they are expected to perform, whether truck driver, stock-handler and so forth.  They must not willingly or knowingly violate any legislation or “standards” and must not in any manner be coerced or threatened, to cause any harm to any Animal in transit, by violating any law or standard or in any way seek to avoid the spirit and intent of this “program”, to fail to recognize Animals as “sentient beings” or display any actions that are not compassionate.

a).        Prescribed straw (for all local, provincial, inter-provincial or export transport) sand and all other food stuffs are to be provided, at no cost, to drivers.

b).        Any driver found negligent or in violation of “program standards” or applicable legislation, such as but not limited to, driving in excess of thirteen (13) hours, falcifying log book entries, etc., including violation of Recommended Codes of practice, as applicable, whom in any manner acts in an inhumane manner toward livestock or travels at speeds exceeding legal posted signs and/or is found to be the cause of an accident, is to be terminated immediately, as it is mandatory for proper training to be provided, thus, no further need for reprimands, as inhumane treatment or other actions will be perceived as intentional and not warranting further warning.

c).        Any Feed-Lot, Livestock Transport Company or Abattoir found negligent or in violation of “program standards” or applicable legislation, including Recommended Codes of Practice, as applicable, are to lose “accreditation” and thus not be used as a “supplier”.

I).         West Hawk, Ontario is to be given high priority of attention and stringent effort made to ensure every aspect of legislation, Recommended Codes of Practice and/or “Conditions, Policies & Standards of the Wholesome & Humane Program, including but not limited to proper supply of straw, proper loading and handling of each species, good health of each species and so forth, are carefully understood and rigorously applied, in all cases, that proper enforcement and application may be established as an example to follow.

II).       No driver shall in any manner seek to avoid inspection at West Hawk, Ontario or any other established weigh station or inspection facility, in Canada, and anyone seeking to do so shall immediately be terminated.

d).        There are to be no incidents whereby a driver may feed animals any prescribed medicines or other concoctions, such as Coca Cola, Whiskey or other drink and “grubbers” (wake-up pills) to try and stimulate animals.

10.       Pigs presented for sale at livestock markets will automatically lose accreditation for their Farmer. Computer Auctions are recommended to replace auction barns, for all species of Animals.

11.       Personnel in charge of Pig Transporters must have completed an approved training course and be able to demonstrate their competence in handling Pigs when loading, unloading and while in transit (where possible, training is to be validated).

a).        Pig handlers must be trained and must understand the likely stress factors Pigs may be subject to, to appreciate how Pigs react to other Pigs, towards man and to strange noises, sights and smells.  Pigs have the following behavior characteristics which must be taken into account when being moved:

I).         They have good all round vision but do not see well at a distance and in certain breeds the ears will further restrict their vision.

II).       They are less inclined than other species to follow one another

III).      Pigs have a very good sense of smell

IV).      Pigs have good hearing

b).        All handling systems must be designed and operated so as to not impede movement of the Pigs and to reduce the incidence of noise.

c).        The timing of transit must be planned to minimize traveling and waiting time for Pigs and they must be unloaded immediately at the Abattoir.

I).         Pigs must be housed and managed to minimize mixing for transportation by remaining in their on-farm social groups but where mixing is unavoidable precautions must be taken to minimize aggression.

II).       Pigs must have access to water up to point of transport but pre-transport fasting is recommended to prevent vomiting during transit.  Food must be withdrawn at least four (4) hours before loading but fasting must not exceed eight (8) hours prior to slaughter.

12.       Where established and available, all transport driver must have in their possession, while driving vehicles, a “livestock capacity document” or such other name to describe such document.  This will give data on the size of the transporter and the calculated carrying capacity for different livestock species under different climatic conditions.

13.       Transport Companies and those hiring vehicle owner/drivers must be responsible for driver training and behavior.  Training is to be formalized, both in understanding animal needs and in skills required to handle trucks moving live cargo, with such Training Program sanctioned by the “Company accredited by The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW)” and such other designated “authority” by The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW):

a).        Special supplementary licensees should become mandatory on completion of required driver/stock-handler training

b).        An identifying “logo” should be affixed and clearly visible on every vehicle/trailer licensed to carry live animals.

c).        All livestock trailers are to be equipped with inside lighting, top and bottom, for night time loading and unloading.

d).        Mandatory sprinklers in all livestock trailers, as well as heaters, for seasonal weather adjustments (as routinely provided for transport of fruit and vegetables).

e).        In cases of highway accidents, downed animals must be removed from vehicles.  They are to be euthanized on the vehicle/trailer in accordance with Regulations.  Veterinarians and local Humane Organization personnel are required to be available simultaneously with traffic clearing services.

f).         Each driver is to attend at each weigh station and never bypass by taking alternate routes, an official stamp is to be required at each check point, drivers are to alert weigh stations of scheduled arrival times, that appropriate authorities, such as R.C.M.P. may schedule their attendance and thus conduct surveillance checks.

14.       Transport Companies in conjunction with Abattoir Veterinary Inspectors are to institute an enhanced Report/Audit beyond any currently expected by law, to include, by carrier, by species and by Province, loss figures of “DOA’S” (dead on arrival), downed Animals, a humane assessment to be completed by Veterinarian Inspectors upon arrival at the Abattoir, to augment reports/audits that may presently cover carcass condition, sanitation and maintenance.

I).         These reports would be intended for submission to Provincial Ministry of Agriculture offices for compilation into data bases and subsequent release of reports annually.

a).        Records of non-compliance, including names of perpetrators to be readily available to the public, upon request.

NOTE: Until this provision can be discussed and accepted by Government to institute provincially or nationally, to reinstate surveillance checks on animals transported by truck, it shall be a condition of compliance to Livestock Transport and Abattoir “suppliers” to members of the Wholesome & Humane Program  to institute such records, Abattoir compile data and provide results in report form to the “Company that accredited them” annually by January 31st each year, with access to reports by The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) upon request. The aforementioned “standards” are deemed acceptable and humane in nature, at this time, and are to be observed by all “Wholesome & Humane Program ” accredited Companies and their “accredited suppliers”, whether Livestock Transport Company, Feed-Lot, Abattoir, Farmer or otherwise.  They are deemed “minimum” standards and a “zero tolerance” level of non-compliance will be strictly observed and enforced.  Any supplier or employee of such employer must comply to not only the specified standard but to the spirit and intent implied, recognizing animals as sentient beings and thus, violation of any stated standard may result in the exclusion of the supplier from further participation by having their accreditation revoked and/or termination of any person violating stated standards may be deemed acceptable, given the nature and facts surrounding each incident but let it be clearly understood, these standards are meant to be observed, without exception and violations, willful or otherwise, will be met with severe penalty.  In this vein, The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) is endeavoring to have each standard adopted as Federal and/or Provincial legislation/regulations, where not currently constituted and under separate cover, is vigorously submitting proposals to applicable Ministers and/or Premiers to this extent, but until then, it is expected Company members will accept in the same spirit as though each was law and thus respond accordingly.

009. ABATTOIR STANDARDS

All Abattoir systems must be designed and managed to ensure livestock are not caused unnecessary distress or discomfort.  The pre-slaughter handling of livestock must be kept to an absolute minimum. Personnel involved in the slaughter must be thoroughly trained and competent to carry out the tasks required of them.

1.         All Abattoirs participating within the “program” must be inspected to Federal Standards.

2.         All slaughter must be under the direct supervision of an Independent Veterinarian:

a).        The Veterinarian must ensure that proper and adequate stunning is performed, for each Animal.

b).        There is to be absolutely “no hoisting”, “throat slitting”, castrating of any conscious Animal, no cutting or scalding of any live Poultry

c).        Electric prods, goads, sticks, whips, “pig slappers”, Boar bashing using iron bars across the snout, etc., must not be used.  An exception may be an electric prod, where any other benign handling aid would place the safety of the stock-handler at risk, such as with an aggressive adult bull or boar and never to be used on any Animal, on the face, anal, udder or genital areas.

d).        Each Animal is to be segregated, at the time of slaughter, to prevent any other Animal from witnessing any aspect of the killing, from “stunning” to “hoisting”, to “throat cutting”, without exception.

I).         Where one person is responsible for the stunning, shackling, hoisting and bleeding of Animals, they must complete all these operations on each individual Animal, in turn.

3.         All equipment used for stunning and killing of Animals, including the stunning pen and/or restraint devices, must be designed, manufactured and maintained to ensure rapid, effective and immediate stunning or killing

a).        Electrical stunning equipment must be designed so that it will not deliver a current below 140 amps and must be maintained for at least 3 seconds.

b).        Reserve equipment for the stunning and killing of Animals must be maintained ready and kept at the place of slaughter for use in emergency.

I).         All slaughter equipment must be thoroughly cleaned after use

II).       Slaughter equipment must be checked at least once daily to ensure it is in working order and in good state of repair, with “emergency” equipment checked at least once weekly.

4.         Special Care Pigs Pigs are highly intelligent and social Animals.  They frequently can expire of heart attacks due to stressful mishandling on trucks, in unloading and from pre-slaughter trauma.  They are too often victims of improper stunning, resulting in an agonizing death.  In addition to considerations outlined within Transport Standards dealing with the handling and care of Pigs, the following is to be observed:

a).        Pigs which, because of their sex, age or origin, are likely to be aggressive, must be segregated from each other at lairage and must stay in on-farm groups or subdivided.

b).        Pigs in lairage pens must not be exposed to bright artificial light or direct sunlight except during antemortem inspection, which must be carried out in a minimum of 220 lux illumination.

c).        Pigs must be handled calmly, quietly and firmly, with care to avoid unnecessary excitement or stress.

d).        Design and construction must encourage pigs to move forward, with as few right angled bends as possible. There must be no projections and obstructions in the passageway and the lighting must be such that it encourages pigs to move forward.  Flooring must be non-slip.  Pigs must not be driven unless the exit or the way forward is clear.

e).        Pigs must be stunned prior to slaughter by means of a stunning system which renders them instantaneously unconscious and insensitive to pain and maintain that state until point of death.  Stunning must be by means of a mechanically-operated instrument or an instrument for stunning by means of electricity, which contains a device which will prevent it from delivering a current below that which it has been set to deliver:

I).         Pigs must only be stunned when they can be stuck immediately afterward with a stun-stick interval of no more than 15 seconds

II).       Techniques which lower the resistance of the pig to electrical current must be used (ie; using wet sponges or electrical tongs).

III).      After incision of the blood vessels, no further dressing procedure shall be performed on the animals for at least 20 seconds and in any case until all brain-stem reflexes have ceased.

f).         The permitted methods of stunning or killing Pigs are as follow:

I).         Captive bolt or free bullet, followed by bleeding

II).       Electronarcosis, followed by bleeding.  In this case, the minimum root mean square current level during stunning must be no less than 140 amps and maintained for a minimum 3 seconds.

III).      Gaseous induced narcosis

IV).      Pigs must be stuck using a sharp knife of not less than 5″ in length.  The knife must be inserted in the midline of the neck at the depression in front of the breast bone and the skin raised with the knife point using light pressure and a lifting movement.  When penetration has been made, the knife handle should be lowered so that the blade is in a near vertical position and pushed upward to sever the major blood vessels.

5.         The installation of closed circuit television (CCTV) in the pre-slaughter handling and slaughter areas is recommended, to monitor and ensure welfare standards are maintained.

6.         Abattoir Management must develop and implement an Animal Welfare Policy, which will include written procedures with regard to maintaining animal welfare in the abattoir, including the responsibilities and duties of staff, emergency procedures.  The Animal Welfare Policy must be regularly reviewed and updated, with access available and forming part of the “accreditation” process, to both the “Company awarding accreditation” and The Council (CLAW), upon request.

I).         Completion of training is to be validated by the aforementioned organizations

II).       At least one Animal Welfare officer should be trained, who will be accountable for the implementation of the animal welfare policy

III).      The Animal Welfare Officer in conjunction with any Independent Veterinarian, will make frequent checks throughout the shift to ensure animals are being effectively stunned and are insensible throughout the slaughter operation.  Where the Veterinarian and/or Animal Welfare Officer find this not to be the case, they must take immediate remedial action.

IV).      Each Animal Welfare Officer will be conversant with legislation governing the operation of an Abattoir, supplementary Conditions, Policies & Standards contained within the Wholesome & Humane Program .

7.         Abattoir Management must develop a comprehensive employee training program based upon the premise Animals are sentient beings and thus must be afforded dignity and respect, with the understanding animals can sense and feel pain and suffering and therefore, training must include sensitivity training, progressive and more humane means of slaughter, interpersonal relationships.  Training programs are to become a part of the accreditation process and will be available for review by the “Company awarding accreditation” and The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) to ensure practical and meaningful.

8.         Abattoir Management in conjunction with both the accrediting Company and The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) will devise a means of impromptu “Inspection of facilities” without notice, by a “representative” of either or both organizations to verify and confirm adherence to established conditions, policies and standards set forth within this program.  It is recognized that an element of so-called “secrecy” is attached to the Abattoir and indeed some “alienation” may exist but we seek to see such mistrust and so forth replaced with a new sense of cooperation and understanding, within the parameters of the Wholesome & Humane Program .  To this end,we feel confident that a rapport will be established and in due course a more appropriate and harmonious relationship will emerge, if all parties give it a chance.

9.         Certain methods of slaughter are commonplace and with each comes its own set of concerns, thus cooperation toward ensuring competent use of methods and developing more progressive means of slaughter is paramount in the process of creating an effective environment.  The following, in part, describes some methods and appropriate concerns to be addressed:

a).        Pigs – Electric Calliper Stunning – Improper positioning of the callipers, insufficient voltage or poorly maintained equipment may be a contributing factor.  The absence of “required electroplectic fits” prior to shackling, hoisting and sticking indicates that the animal had been only paralyzed while remaining fully conscious to pain.

b).        Cattle – Captive Bolt – Highly prone to human error due to poor positioning and/or low velocity. The bolt is propelled either by blank cartridge or by compressed air, with the objective being to render the animal insensible without impeding the operation of the heart.

c).        Sheep, Calves & Goats – Sledgehammer – Swung manually by the operator; problems of accuracy, with dire results (not used in Federal Plants).

d).        Poultry – Low voltage stunning – independent scientific studies show that some 70.0% of poultry are likely to regain consciousness prior to knifing and scalding, due to insufficient voltage.

e).        Ritual slaughter – Kosher, Halal – Animals are not pre-stunned but are fully conscious from beginning to end (shackled, hoisted, restrained, knifed, bled out).  It is the position of The Council Animal Advocacy (CLAW) that animal welfare supersedes any “religious” considerations, that inhumane actions by foreign cultures do not constitute acceptable reasons for continuing such culture in Canada, as may apply to perceived inhumane acts being perpetuated upon animals.

10.       Abattoir Standards call for development of an Employee Training Program therefore, we propose two scenarios.  First, existing training programs may seek to be accredited.  Secondly, rather than “reinvent the wheel”, The Council animal Advocacy (CLAW) proposed adoption of the program observed in Gt. Britain, by the Freedom Food Program Ltd. and the most progressive and humane methods used to comprise the needed Training Program, for accreditation.

a).        To obtain copies of the proposed Training Program which includes a Video (specify video format VHS) and a Workbook, send your request to:

– Sir Michael Simmons, Humane Slaughter Association, 34 Blanche Lane, South Mimms, Potters Bar, Herts ENG 3PA  (Tel. 01707 659040  Fax. 01707 649279). Cost: U.S. dollars $ 75.00 includes shipping & handling.

b).        The Training Program consists of “Humane Slaughter – Taking Responsibilty

– Unique new video and training package.

– Aimed primarily at slaughter house and lairage workers, although also of interest to all those

involved with the more humane handling and slaughter of cattle, sheep and pigs.

Total length about 90 minutes.

– Divided into 15 sections (corresponding to workbooks)

1.         Why is animal welfare important?

2.         Animal behavior

3.         What type of handler are you?

4.         Handling and the flight zone

5.         Arrival at lairage

6.         Moving Animals

7.         Animals in pens

8.         From lairage to the stunning room

9.         Captive bolt – how does it work?

10.       Using the captive-bolt

11.       Electrical stunning – how does it work?

12.       Using electrical stunning equipment

13.       Carbon dioxide anesthesia

14.       Sticking and bleeding

15.       Taking responsibility

010.     COPYRIGHT – c ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 1997 – 2007 NORTH AMERICA

001.     This document is protected by copyright law, with “All Rights Reserved”, including all titles, names, terminology, conditions, policies, standards, forms, agreements, logos, trademarks and any other form of documentation contained within such program and further means “all copyright” whether protected by copyright law or registered, devised or acquired by the North American Wholesome & Humane Program , relating to the scheme, that contained within the North American Wholesome & Humane Program  is vested in the North American Wholesome & Humane Program  and as being the sole property of the North American Wholesome & Humane Program  and as such may not be used, reprinted, reproduced, completely or in part, for any reason, without the express authorization, in writing, from the North American Wholesome & Humane Program .

VEGETARIAN SEAL OF APPROVAL PROGRAM

EFFECTIVE MAY 1, 2006

This is an independently owned and operated program that may see participation in by Companies “accredited” to participate within the Wholesome & Humane Program and/or any Company (Retail, Manufacturer, etc.) whom may desire to participate and thus be “accredited” to participate in this “stand alone” Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program.

0010. VEGETARIAN SEAL OF APPROVAL PROGRAM

001.     PREAMBLE

01.       There is a growing awareness of the health benefits of eating less meat and more fruits and vegetables.  There is also growing awareness among the general public regarding the inhumane conditions in which animals are raised within the intensive or factory farming system. There is a growing number of consumers who eat either a fully vegetarian diet or at least, such diet during at least part of the week, on a regular basis, for health, religious, environmental or ethical reasons. Presently, the only way to tell if a product has meat or animal products in it is to read the label, a time-consuming and not always easy task.  In order to assist Consumers to make a more informed and convenient choice, some form of easily identifiable labelling is needed and may be similar to such “seal of approval” used by the Vegetarian Society of the United Kingdom or Vegan Seal Program in the United States.  The experience in the U.K. was that many products labeled as “suitable for vegetarians” by the retailer/manufacturer were rejected by the Vegetarian Society when approval was applied for. Any labeling or seal of approval program must therefore be independent from any retailer/manufacturer in order to achieve and maintain Consumer confidence. The North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program is loosely based upon factors contained within such accepted programs as the Vegetarian Society “V” Symbol Approval Program and the Vegan Seal of Approval but is not affiliated with or connected to in any manner whatsoever.

002.     The following parameters of operation and standards set forth conditions to be met by participating companies to receive accreditation.

01.       This Vegetarian/Vegan Seal of Approval Program is an independent “Accreditation Seal of Approval Program” privately owned and governed by the non-profit organization The North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program.

02.       The North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program shall:

a).        retain the right to accept, reject or discontinue the accreditation of any company and/or product

b).        be the final arbitrator in any dispute

c).        retain The Council animal Advocacy (CLAW) to “accredit” participation in the Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program governed under the auspices of the Wholesome & Humane Program .

03.       The North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program is open to all retailers, manufacturers and others, in relation to national brands and/or their own ‘house brand’.

003.     To adopt a policy making a wider variety of Vegetarian products available to Consumers and to promote alternatives to other products that either contain Animal ingredients or have been tested upon Animals.

004.     To adopt a policy to end purchasing product that has been derived, in part or completely by the use of testing upon animals:

01.       where not required by Federal Government Regulation and

02.       where required by Federal Government Regulation, to work with Government, Suppliers and other interested parties, to replace mandatory animal testing with alternative testing methods such as computer modeling, human cell cultures and chemical tests.

005.     Standards Products covered under the program include food & drink (grocery products) and other products, including but not limited to cosmetics, health & beauty aids, toiletries, household cleaners and so forth. To qualify as a “Vegetarian” Food product, it must not contain any of the following ingredients:

01.       Meat, including red meat, venison, poultry, & other bird flesh, fish and shellfish.

02.       Any slaughterhouse products or by-products, including gelatin, bone meal, meat by-products, rennet obtained from calf sources.

03.       Royal Jelly

04.       Cochineal

05.       Sugar refined with the use of bone charcoal

06.       Eggs from intensively-raised systems

07.       Meat or bone stock, including fish and bird stock

08.       Animal fats, including suet, lard, dripping, white cooking fats, margarine, etc., which are used either in as an ingredient or as part of the cooking process, such as greasing or baking trays, frying or other purposes.

09.       Any beer, wine or other alcoholic drink, including dealcholized products which have been manufactured using animal products such as gelatin and isinglass

10.       Any dairy products or dairy by-products produced from cows treated with any recombinant growth hormone or similar substances.

11.       Any products or ingredients thereof that have been tested on animals since 1992.

006.     For a non-food product to be classified, it must meet the following criteria:

01.       Must not contain animal products or by-products

02.       The product or any of its ingredients must not have been tested on Animals since 1992.

007.     Most margarine’s contain Vitamin D which is obtained from Animal sources.  There are some margarine’s which use non-animal sources of Vitamin D and these would be acceptable.

008.     The above lists of products may be amended from time-to-time, upon six (6) weeks written notice being provided to participants.

009.     Accreditation Fee Schedule

01.       Upon receiving accreditation, the participating Company shall display the appropriate “logo” that will indicate the Company product as being an approved MEMBER.

02.       The following accreditation fee schedule will apply and may be pro-rated, by month(s) of participation in a calendar year.  The schedule and corresponding fees shall be reviewed annually and become effective on the 1st day of January:

03.       A non-refundable application fee of $ 300.00 is payable, for each product, and is to be submitted accompanying the application for product approval.

a).        The application fee is waived for “accredited” members of the Wholesome & Humane Program .

04.       An annual fee and/or for such pro-rated period of time within a calendar year, in the amount of $ 1000.00 annually, per product, is due upon date of approval.

a).        The annual fee and/or pro-rated part thereof, shall be reduced for “accredited” members of the Wholesome & Humane Program , in the annual amount of $ 500.00 per product.

010.     Marketing & Promotion

01.       The approved “logo” indicating “accreditation” of a company/product is to be displayed in all marketing of such product.

02.       To consider inclusion of acceptable Vegetarian/Vegan Recipe Books in Library/Book section of Retail Companies

011.     Administration

It is recognized that each product and its ingredients is sensitive and thus will be treated in the strictest confidence until such date as the product is “accredited” and thus enters the realm of public knowledge, which shall thereafter find the retailer and/or manufacturer publish such ingredients, for public consideration to purchase or not.

01.       Applicants shall submit the appropriate form, including each product listed separately, to the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program for consideration and requested approval of “accreditation”.

a).        a full and complete list of all ingredients must be provided.

b).        Companies agree to be fully open and cooperative throughout the process of accreditation and shall upon further contact be prepared to provide further information, as required, that may pertain to ingredient origins

c).        any changes to the ingredients, manufacturing process or supplier shall be provided to the North American Seal of Approval Program immediately, so continued accreditation may continue. Failure to do so within twenty-four hours (24) will require the product to be treated as a “new product” and will be subject to undergoing the complete accreditation procedure again.

02.       Upon accreditation the company shall be authorized to display the appropriate “logo”

03.       By signing the applicable AGREEMENT the Company is thereafter bound by such terms and conditions, for each ‘product’ applied to be considered a Vegetarian Product.

012.     COPYRIGHT – c ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2007 NORTH AMERICA

001.     This document is protected by copyright law, with “All Rights Reserved”, including all titles, names, terminology, conditions, policies, standards, forms, agreements, logos, trademarks and any other form of documentation contained within such program and further means “all copyright” whether protected by copyright law or registered, devised or acquired by the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program relating to the scheme, that contained within the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program is vested in the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program and as being the sole property of the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program and as such may not be used, reprinted, reproduced, completely or in part, for any reason, without the express authorization, in writing, from the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program.

THE NORTH AMERICAN VEGETARIAN SEAL OF APPROVAL PROGRAM APPLICATION FOR ACCREDITATION AS A DULY CONSTITUTED VEGETARIAN PRODUCT

1.         Company Name:

2.         Authorized Contact:

3.         Address:

4.         Postal Code:

5.         Telephone:                    (   )                           6. Fax:   (   )

7.         E-Mail:

8.         Product Name:

9.         Where product is available from (Province/ type of store):

10.       Product description, including a complete ingredient listing, origin of items, such as cheese (rennet), vitamins, flavorings, coloring, etc.: we are seeking accreditation.  We have read and understand the provisions of the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program  and hereby agree to abaide by all such conditions therein.

Dated and signed at                                 in the Province of

this                day of                                    20      .

For the COMPANY

Authorized Agent/Representative

Print Name

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT:

Received by the North American Vegetarian Seal of Approval Program this       day of                             20    .

Authorized Signature

APPROVAL/DENIAL:

The product described and explained in the aforementioned documentation is hereby:

Approved:        This       day of                       20     .

Declined:          This       day of                        20      .

Authorized Signature

The product approved herein shall be duly constituted and accepted for use effective upon signature and dating

of the prescribed AGREEMENT FORM and shall remain in full force and effect thereafter.

 

Content Introduction Conditions & Policies Welfare Standards Pet Food Standards

Implementation Consumer Checklist No. 1